Archive for December, 2008

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News - Quick Links

Cogmed network gathers in Phoenix

 

Posted: December 1, 2008 - The annual Cogmed conference was held in Phoenix, AZ in October, providing a forum for Cogmed practitioners to share ideas, experiences and best practices. With more than 60 members of the network in attendance, the event was a great success.

User Profile: Lorraine O’Neill – Sixty-five year-old woman regains focus through computerized training

 

Posted: December 1, 2008 - When sixty-five year-old Lorraine O'Neill lost her husband of some forty years, she found herself faced with a mountain of daily tasks that he had previously handled.

Practice in focus: Dr. Aronson-Ramos – Cogmed represents a new approach to patient care

 

Posted: December 1, 2008 - Dr. Judith Aronson-Ramos is a Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrician practicing in Boca Raton, Florida. Originally a General Pediatrician, she has focused on special needs children for more than ten years, including many who struggle with the ability to focus.

Cogmed founder releases new book on information overload

 

Posted: December 1, 2008 - Torkel Klingberg is a co-founder of Cogmed and professor of neuroscience at the Karolinska Institute. He recently released The Overflowing Brain: Information Overload and the Limits of Working Memory.

Cogmed Newsletter #8, December 2008

 

Posted: December 1, 2008 - 2008 has proven to be a pivotal year for Cogmed and the cognitive training industry as a whole. Backed by a growing body of independent, peer-reviewed research and widespread clinical experience, the Cogmed training programs have achieved new levels of acceptance in medical and educational communities around the world.

Training and transfer effects of executive functions in preschool children

 

Lisa Thorell, PhD, finds that preschool children with healthy working memory capacity can increase their working memory through training. These improvements were then shown to transfer to strengthen visual and auditory attention, providing evidence that unlike many forms of cognitive training, working memory training benefits other parts of the mind.